How to Stop Chkdsk Running on Every Startup

Introduction

Chkdsk running on startup.
Waiting for Chkdsk to scan your PC's drive on startup can be time consuming, but having to wait for it on every startup can get frustrating very quickly. If you don't want to have to skip the Chkdsk every time you're starting up your PC, there are a couple methods through which you can disable the automatic Chkdsk:

  • Using the Command Prompt
  • Using the Registry Editor

This guide will show you how to accomplish this through either of these methods.

1 Disable Automatic Chkdsk

If Chkdsk is running on every startup, it means it will show you on screen during every run which drive is being checked. Take note of the drive letter as you will need it later on. In most cases it will be C: but it can be any other letter.
Drive letter highlighted and pointed out on startup Chkdsk screen.

Method 1:

  1. Type cmd in the search field at the bottom left corner of your screen.
    cmd keyword highlighted in Windows 10 search box.
  2. Right click Command Prompt in the search results then left click Run as administrator.
    Command Prompt pointed out in search results and Run as administrator highlighted in context menu.
  3. If you get a prompt asking you if you want to allow the app to make changes to your device, choose Yes.
    Yes highlighted on User Account Control prompt.
  4. The Command Prompt will open up. Make sure it says Administrator in the top left corner of the window. If it doesn't say that, you need to repeat the above steps.
    Administrator pointed out in open Command Prompt.
  5. Type the following command:
    chkntfs C: /x

    Typically, C: will be the drive needing the scan. Use the drive letter you noted at the start of this step. Press Enter on your keyboard when done.
    Typed in command pointed out in Command Prompt.

Method 2:

Use caution when performing this procedure as incorrect Windows Registry modifications may cause serious problems with your system. You may skip this process if you don't feel comfortable with it.

  1. Type regedit in the search field at the bottom left corner of your screen then click the search result with the same name.
    regedit keyword highlighted in Windows 10 search box and result pointed out.
  2. If you get a prompt asking you if you want to allow the app to make changes to your device, choose Yes.
    Yes highlighted on User Account Control prompt.
  3. The Registry Editor will open up.
    Windows 10 Registry Editor.
  4. Within the Registry Editor, expand the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE key and the following subkeys SYSTEM > CurrentControlSet > Control.
    Keys to be expanded highlighted in Windows Registry.
  5. Scroll down and locate the Session Manager subkey then click on it. In the right pane, look for BootExecute and double click it.
    Session Manager subkey highlighted and BootExecute value pointed out in Registry Editor.
  6. Make sure the text in the Value data box says autocheck autochk *. If it doesn't, edit the text and click OK.
    Value Data text pointed out and OK highlighted in registry value editing box.
  7. If the text in Value data box already says "autocheck autochk *", edit it to say autocheck autochk /k:C *. The letter C in the /k:C parameter is the drives letter and has to be the same with what you made note of earlier. Click OK when done.
    Value Data text pointed out and OK highlighted in registry value editing box.

? Does Chkdsk still run automatically on every startup?

  1. Yes, let's restore the system to an earlier state
  2. No, the system starts up normally

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Chkdsk running on startup.
Waiting for Chkdsk to scan your PC's drive on startup can be time consuming, but having to wait for it on every startup can get frustrating very quickly. If you don't want to have to skip the Chkdsk every time you're starting up your PC, there are a couple methods through which you can disable the automatic Chkdsk:

  • Using the Command Prompt
  • Using the Registry Editor

This guide will show you how to accomplish this through either of these methods.

If Chkdsk is running on every startup, it means it will show you on screen during every run which drive is being checked. Take note of the drive letter as you will need it later on. In most cases it will be C: but it can be any other letter.
Drive letter highlighted and pointed out on startup Chkdsk screen.

Method 1:

  1. Type cmd in the search field at the bottom left corner of your screen.
    cmd keyword highlighted in Windows 10 search box.
  2. Right click Command Prompt in the search results then left click Run as administrator.
    Command Prompt pointed out in search results and Run as administrator highlighted in context menu.
  3. If you get a prompt asking you if you want to allow the app to make changes to your device, choose Yes.
    Yes highlighted on User Account Control prompt.
  4. The Command Prompt will open up. Make sure it says Administrator in the top left corner of the window. If it doesn't say that, you need to repeat the above steps.
    Administrator pointed out in open Command Prompt.
  5. Type the following command:
    chkntfs C: /x

    Typically, C: will be the drive needing the scan. Use the drive letter you noted at the start of this step. Press Enter on your keyboard when done.
    Typed in command pointed out in Command Prompt.

Method 2:

Use caution when performing this procedure as incorrect Windows Registry modifications may cause serious problems with your system. You may skip this process if you don't feel comfortable with it.

  1. Type regedit in the search field at the bottom left corner of your screen then click the search result with the same name.
    regedit keyword highlighted in Windows 10 search box and result pointed out.
  2. If you get a prompt asking you if you want to allow the app to make changes to your device, choose Yes.
    Yes highlighted on User Account Control prompt.
  3. The Registry Editor will open up.
    Windows 10 Registry Editor.
  4. Within the Registry Editor, expand the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE key and the following subkeys SYSTEM > CurrentControlSet > Control.
    Keys to be expanded highlighted in Windows Registry.
  5. Scroll down and locate the Session Manager subkey then click on it. In the right pane, look for BootExecute and double click it.
    Session Manager subkey highlighted and BootExecute value pointed out in Registry Editor.
  6. Make sure the text in the Value data box says autocheck autochk *. If it doesn't, edit the text and click OK.
    Value Data text pointed out and OK highlighted in registry value editing box.
  7. If the text in Value data box already says "autocheck autochk *", edit it to say autocheck autochk /k:C *. The letter C in the /k:C parameter is the drives letter and has to be the same with what you made note of earlier. Click OK when done.
    Value Data text pointed out and OK highlighted in registry value editing box.

Turning the system off while System Restore is running can cause corruption. If your device is battery-operated, connect it to a power outlet first as System Restore may take time and should not be interrupted.

System restore will remove any programs installed and settings made after the selected date.

  1. Select the Start Menu, and type in rstrui. Select rstrui from the list.
    Start menu search for rstrui with Start menu, search field, and search result highlighted.
  2. System Restore will open. Select Next.
    System Restore welcome screen with Next highlighted.
  3. Select a date before the issue started, you may see more than 1 restore point. Select Next afterwards.
    System restore with restore date and Next highlighted.
  4. Confirm your restore point by selecting Finish.
    Confirm restore to restore point with Finish highlighted.
  5. A message warning you that once started, the system restore can't be stopped or undone. Select Yes to proceed.
    Confirm system restore with Yes highlighted.
  6. Your system will take a few moments to ready the system restore.
    Readying system restore.
  7. Your screen will turn blue, and the system restore will begin.
    System Restore in progress

    It can take a long time, over an hour in some cases, for System Restore to complete.

    Do not turn off or power down your computer during a System Restore. If you are using a laptop, make sure it is plugged into power so the battery does not run out during this process.

  8. Your computer will reboot on its own when complete.
  9. After returning to your Desktop, a message letting you the System Restore was successful is displayed. Select Close.
    System Restore complete with Close highlighted.
Performing a Windows 10 Reset keeps your personal files, settings, and apps that came installed on your machine intact. For portable devices: Before proceeding with a Reset, make sure the device is connected to a power outlet to avoid power loss during the reset process.
You will lose any and all customized settings made, as well as any extra programs you've installed since you first got your computer.
  1. Select the Start menu.
    Windows 10 Start Menu
  2. Select the Settings button on the left side of the start menu.
    Windows 10 Settings
  3. Select Update and Security.
    Windows Settings with Update and Security highlighted.
  4. Select Recovery.
    Update and Security Settings menu with Recovery highlighted.
  5. On the left, under Reset this PC, select Get started.
    Update and Security settings Recovery options Reset this PC section with Get started button highlighted.
  6. Select Keep my files.
    Reset this PC with Keep my files highlighted.
  7. Take note of any apps that will need to be reinstalled, then select Next.
    Reset this PC apps list with Next highlighted.
  8. At this point, the system is ready to be reset. This process may take quite a while, and the system will automatically restart when needed. Select Reset when you're ready to continue.
    Confirm reset with Reset highlighted.
  9. Windows 10 will start the reset process and may reboot several times while running. Follow any on-screen instructions that may require your attention.
    Windows Resetting PC
  10. Once the process is complete, you may use your system again.
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