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How To Protect And Strengthen The Security Of Android Devices

1 Set A Screen Lock

Setting up a screen lock is one of the first steps in securing an Android device. When a phone lock is enabled, device data and other personal information are not just protected from prying eyes but also from criminals and other malicious hackers as well.


The advancements in mobile technology have made setting up a phone lock easier and more effortlessly than ever. Unlike the old model of mobile devices that utilize swipe patterns, pin codes, and passwords (which makes unlocking a little inconvenient), the current generation of mobile handsets provide users with a wide array of screen lock options including the ability lock and unlock mobile devices with fingerprints, facial recognition technologies, gestures, etc.

2 Encrypt Your Data

Given the amount of data and personal information on a typical smartphone, it could be disastrous if a device falls into the wrong hands without data encryption. Many identity thefts occur as a result of poor or lack of encryption. However, when a device is encrypted, it becomes extremely difficult if not impossible for hackers to break into, thus protecting data from unauthorized access.


Encrypting an Android device is simple. Here is how:


Go to “Settings”


Select “Security and privacy”


Tap on “Encryption and Credentials” and follow the instructions on the pop-up page.

3 Switch Off Mobile Data, WiFi, and Bluetooth When Not In Use

Disconnecting your Android device from WiFi and other connectivity when you’re not actively using it can help prevent an attack and unauthorized access to your network. Doing so can also help increase your battery’s life cycle. So, whenever you’re inactive it’s best to turn off your connectivity.

4 Limit The Use Of Public WiFi

It’s enticing to use public WiFi, especially when it’s open and free. However, doing so can compromise the security of your device and personal data. If you must use a public WiFi inquire if it’s legitimate and whether it’s secured with encryption and other security protections.

Additionally, you can employ VPN services and privacy browser such as Brave when on public WiFi to protect against malware. That will help disguise your IP address and other digital identifiers, making it hard for cybercriminals to track a particular activity back to you.

5 Don’t Click On Unknown Links

Whenever you receive a link via email or text message, it’s always best to take a moment to confirm the identity of the sender before you click. For safety, avoid clicking unknown links altogether or install a malware blocker to filter out malicious links and other phishing messages.

6 Delete Unused Apps

No app is 100% secure. However, most manufacturers do a great job at keeping their products secure by frequently issuing security updates and patches. Therefore, it’s advisable to uninstall any app you’ve not used in a long time or download the latest version. That way, hackers have fewer chances of finding a backdoor into your device.

7 Activate Find My Device

Most Android devices come with Find My Device feature which enables owners to remotely monitor and control their devices. All you need to do is install or enable Find My Device feature on your device and log in with your Google account.

Now, whenever you lose track of your device, go to Find My Device website (https://myaccount.google.com/intro/find-your-phone) and sign in with the email account you registered with. From there, you can decide whether to erase your data in the event of a lost or stolen phone or send a return instruction to the finder.

8 Enable Two-Factor Authentication

Since Google account plays a huge role in finding and recovering a lost or stolen device, it’s crucial to enable two-factor authentication. Multi-factor or two-factor authentication is a method of verifying users’ identities by employing a combination of two or more factors i.e. passwords, one-time code, and knowledge-based questions such as date of birth, ZIP code, etc. If hackers steal your password when two-factor authentication is on, they won’t be able to access your account unless they also gain control of your phone or crack your other identity information.

While multi-factor authentication won’t protect against theft, it can help ensure that the data on your device is secure. For instance, if a criminal tries to access your account via an unknown device, Google will call or send an authentication code to the phone number you registered with. That way you’ll know that someone is trying to break in and take steps to reset your password if you think it’s been compromised.

9 Install The Latest Android OS Update

Most Android devices receive a monthly or quarterly update or security patch from Google. Make sure you install this update once it’s available to you to prevent malicious actors from exploiting vulnerabilities in your device’s operating system. If you can’t immediately install the update, schedule for it to be installed at a later date. However, don’t procrastinate for too long as it can leave your device exposed to breaches and hacking attempts.

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Setting up a screen lock is one of the first steps in securing an Android device. When a phone lock is enabled, device data and other personal information are not just protected from prying eyes but also from criminals and other malicious hackers as well.


The advancements in mobile technology have made setting up a phone lock easier and more effortlessly than ever. Unlike the old model of mobile devices that utilize swipe patterns, pin codes, and passwords (which makes unlocking a little inconvenient), the current generation of mobile handsets provide users with a wide array of screen lock options including the ability lock and unlock mobile devices with fingerprints, facial recognition technologies, gestures, etc.

Given the amount of data and personal information on a typical smartphone, it could be disastrous if a device falls into the wrong hands without data encryption. Many identity thefts occur as a result of poor or lack of encryption. However, when a device is encrypted, it becomes extremely difficult if not impossible for hackers to break into, thus protecting data from unauthorized access.


Encrypting an Android device is simple. Here is how:


Go to “Settings”


Select “Security and privacy”


Tap on “Encryption and Credentials” and follow the instructions on the pop-up page.

Disconnecting your Android device from WiFi and other connectivity when you’re not actively using it can help prevent an attack and unauthorized access to your network. Doing so can also help increase your battery’s life cycle. So, whenever you’re inactive it’s best to turn off your connectivity.

It’s enticing to use public WiFi, especially when it’s open and free. However, doing so can compromise the security of your device and personal data. If you must use a public WiFi inquire if it’s legitimate and whether it’s secured with encryption and other security protections.

Additionally, you can employ VPN services and privacy browser such as Brave when on public WiFi to protect against malware. That will help disguise your IP address and other digital identifiers, making it hard for cybercriminals to track a particular activity back to you.

Whenever you receive a link via email or text message, it’s always best to take a moment to confirm the identity of the sender before you click. For safety, avoid clicking unknown links altogether or install a malware blocker to filter out malicious links and other phishing messages.

No app is 100% secure. However, most manufacturers do a great job at keeping their products secure by frequently issuing security updates and patches. Therefore, it’s advisable to uninstall any app you’ve not used in a long time or download the latest version. That way, hackers have fewer chances of finding a backdoor into your device.

Most Android devices come with Find My Device feature which enables owners to remotely monitor and control their devices. All you need to do is install or enable Find My Device feature on your device and log in with your Google account.

Now, whenever you lose track of your device, go to Find My Device website (https://myaccount.google.com/intro/find-your-phone) and sign in with the email account you registered with. From there, you can decide whether to erase your data in the event of a lost or stolen phone or send a return instruction to the finder.

Since Google account plays a huge role in finding and recovering a lost or stolen device, it’s crucial to enable two-factor authentication. Multi-factor or two-factor authentication is a method of verifying users’ identities by employing a combination of two or more factors i.e. passwords, one-time code, and knowledge-based questions such as date of birth, ZIP code, etc. If hackers steal your password when two-factor authentication is on, they won’t be able to access your account unless they also gain control of your phone or crack your other identity information.

While multi-factor authentication won’t protect against theft, it can help ensure that the data on your device is secure. For instance, if a criminal tries to access your account via an unknown device, Google will call or send an authentication code to the phone number you registered with. That way you’ll know that someone is trying to break in and take steps to reset your password if you think it’s been compromised.

Most Android devices receive a monthly or quarterly update or security patch from Google. Make sure you install this update once it’s available to you to prevent malicious actors from exploiting vulnerabilities in your device’s operating system. If you can’t immediately install the update, schedule for it to be installed at a later date. However, don’t procrastinate for too long as it can leave your device exposed to breaches and hacking attempts.